Putting a Crescent on top of the minaret of a mosque

Discussion in 'TurnToIslam Lounge !' started by Salem9022, May 21, 2008.

  1. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    Regaurding the use of the cressent: 1. Is it sunnah to use the cressent moon as a symbol? (i.e. hadith or Qur'an?) 2. secondarlly so, on the top of the Masjid in Bloomington IN ( and many MANY others around the world) they use this symbol, BUT I heard from a brother that it was originally a pagan symbol (worship of the moon etc) --- if so should we not all remove this? I am a bit confused and have been unable to find fatwa or hadith. thank you - wa alekium salaam.


    --Praise be to Allaah.

    After consulting with scholars and muftis, we have learned that there is no known basis in Islam for putting a crescent on top of the minaret. Some scholars forbid doing so and consider it to be something that is newly-innovated in the religion. The practice may also contain some element of imitating the kuffaar, especially if it is proven that the crescent is a symbol used by those who worship heavenly bodies. So we should not use this symbol, and the mosque’s money should not be spent on something that serves no Islamic purpose. And Allaah knows best.

    Islam Q&A
    Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid


    http://www.islam-qa.com/en/ref/575/moon symbol

    [​IMG]
  2. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    What is the symbolism behind the Muslim star and crescent? I did a keyword search of your site and searched my library's reference books and cannot find anything more than a reference to the flag of the Ottoman Empire. Thank you for your interest.

    Praise be to Allaah.

    There is no basis in sharee’ah for taking the crescent or star as a symbol of the Muslims. This was not known at the time of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), or at the time of the Khulafa’ al-Raashidoon (the first four leaders of Islam after the death of the Prophet (peace and blessings of Allaah be upon him), or during the time of the Umawis (Umayyad dynasty). It emerged some time after that, and historians differ as to when this symbol was first adopted and who was the first to adopt it. Some say it was the Persians, others say it was the Greeks, and that this symbol was somehow passed to the Muslims. (See Al-Taraateeb al-Idaariyah by al-Kittaani, 1/320). It was said that the reason why the Muslims adopted the crescent was that when they conquered some western countries, the churches there had crosses on top of them, the Muslims replaced the crosses with these crescents, and the practice spread in this way. Whatever the case, symbols and banners must be in accordance with the teachings of Islam, and as there is no evidence that this symbol is prescribed by Islam, it is better not to use it. Neither the crescent nor the star are symbols of the Muslims, even though some Muslims may use them as symbols.
    As regards what Muslims think about the moon and the stars, they believe that they are part of the creation of Allaah, and as such can neither benefit nor harm people, and they do not have any influence over events on earth. Allaah has created them for the benefit of mankind, an example of which is seen in the aayah or verse of the Qur’aan (interpretation of the meaning):

    “They ask you (O Muhammad) about the new moons. Say: These are signs to mark fixed periods of time for mankind and for the pilgrimage…” [al-Baqarah 2:189]

    [The commentator] Ibn Katheer said, explaining the phrase Say: these are signs to mark fixed periods of time: “From them (the new moons) they may know the times for repaying loans, the ‘iddah (waiting period) of their women [after being divorced or widowed] and the timing of their Hajj (pilgrimage)… Allaah has made them signs to mark the times when Muslims should start to fast and break their fast [the beginning and end of Ramadaan], to count the ‘iddah of their women and to know the times for repaying loans.” (Tafseer Ibn Katheer).

    [Another commentator] Al-Qurtubi (may Allaah have mercy on him) said in his commentary on this aayah [verse]: “This explains the wisdom behind the waxing and waning of the moon, which is to avoid any confusion in appointed dates, dealings, oaths, Hajj, ‘iddah, fasting, breaking fasts, length of pregnancy, rentals and other matters that concern mankind. Similar to this aayah are others (interpretation of the meanings):

    ‘And We have appointed the night and the day as two aayaat (signs). Then, We have made dark the sign of the night while We have made the sign of day illuminating, that you may seek bounty from your Lord, and that you may know the number of the years and the reckoning…” [al-Isra’ 17:12]

    ‘It is He Who made the sun a shining thing and the moon as a light and measured out its (their) stages, that you might know the number of years and the reckoning…’ [Yoonus 10:5]

    Counting the new moons is easier than counting days.” (See Tafseer al-Qurtubi).

    With regard to the stars, the scholars of Islam say that Allaah created these stars for three reasons: to adorn the heavens, to drive away the devils (shayaateen) and as signs for navigation. (Saheeh al-Bukhaari, Kitaab Bad’ al-Khalq), as Allaah says (interpretation of the meaning):

    “It is He Who has set the stars for you, so that you may guide your course with their help through the darkness of the land and the sea…” [al-An’aam 6:97]

    “And indeed We have adorned the nearest heaven with lamps, and We have made such lamps (as) missiles to drive away the shayaateen (devils), and have prepared for them the torment of the blazing Fire.” [al-Mulk 67:5]


    Islam Q&A
    Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid

    http://www.islam-qa.com/en/ref/1528/moon symbol
  3. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    Muslim holidays & symbol

    Do Islams have certain holidays that christans don't if so what are they?
    What is your holy symbol like ours is the cross, do you have a specific symbol?


    Muslims have only two Holy days to celebrate. The two Holy days are Eid Alfitir, which follows the holy month of Ramadan, and Eid Aladha, which is in the Hajj (holy pilgrimage) season. Muslims celebrate Eid Aladha by slaughtering a sheep. The slaughtering of sheep is done in following the footsteps of Prophet Abraham when he was ordered by Allah (God) to slaughter his first child, Ishmael. When he told his son about it, his son told him to carry on with the order of Allah, and that he will be obedient and patient. As Abraham was tempting to slaughter Ishmael, Allah gave them a big and fat sheep to slaughter instead. The sacrificing of a sheep has become a ritual for Muslims every year in remembrance of the obedience of Abraham and Ishmael, peace be upon them. Our celebration of this day and the slaughtering of the sheep are in compliance with the teachings of our Prophet Mohammad, praising and peace of Allah be upon him. Only Muslims celebrate these two days, while at the same time, Muslims do not celebrate the Christian holidays.

    As for the symbol, Muslims worship Allah (God), therefor they reject any kind of idol worshipping. We believe that Christians believe in the cross to be a symbol of their God, or the so claimed Son of God. They seek blessing and protection from this cross. Muslims seek protection and blessing only from Allah, that is why we do not have an Islamic symbol as the Christians’ cross. Some Muslims have invented the symbol of a crescent to counter the cross, but this is not authentic and it is considered as an innovation in Islam.

    Islam Q&A
    Sheikh Muhammed Salih Al-Munajjid

    http://www.islam-qa.com/en/ref/4526/crescent

    [​IMG]
  4. Allahu_Hassbi
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    Allahu_Hassbi Junior Member

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    :salam2:
    Jazak Allahu khairan brother for enlightening us with the above ....
    Barak Allahu Feek
    :wasalam:
  5. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    wa iyaak ukhti
  6. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    This combination is seen in the flag of Turkey. There are many imitators, but they are just that... Due to the 1,000 year fight of Muslim Turk and Christian Europe, the symbols have come to be mistakingly representative of Islam by Europeans and now the world. The Crescent Moon and Star (Sun during the Ottoman Empire) are ancient Turkish celestial symbols of power originating from the Turkish, ancestoral lands of Siberia and Central Asia.

    Its origins are not Arabic or Persian and it can not be Islamic due to the strict, religious doctrines forbiding the usage of any symbols or the painting/drawing/sclupting of human faces... these very important religious facts are disregarded today by those trying to claim the Moon & Star as their own today.

    Needless to say, the origins of the Crescent & Sun/star are in fact Turkish from ancient times, pre-Islamic. The Turks believed in Shamanisim and more importantly the one supreme Sky God (Tanri) along side others gods like that of the Moon & Sun, when they roamed nomadicaly on horseback in the steppes of Siberia & central Asia.
    In the 10th century, the Turks accepted Islam on their own will and conquered the Middle East. Witin a few centuries, the Turks became extremely powerful and strected an empire from the gates of Vienna, Austria, Russia all the way to Spain in the west. They brought into Islam their own free spirit, dynamizm, Turkish culture, superstitions and serious beliefs as well. This is the origin of how the Crescent Moon & Star came into the Islamic world.
    The importance of the celestial bodies can be seen in many Turk epics, poems, songs, names etc... One quick example is that of the legendary leader of the Western Turks, Oguz Khan, named his first 3 born Sun, Moon, & Star emphasizing the importance of the celestial objects to Turks. The founder of the Ottoman Turkish empire, Osman, had a dream in which he invisioned a Crescent Moon stretching over the Earth, he took it as a good sign and made it the symbol of his dynasty. Where ever a Turkish army met with a Euro-Christian one, of course it would be seen that the Turks used a Moon and Europeans assumed that this was the symbol of Islam used by muslim people. [this was wrong of course, as I said no symbols are allowed, but Turks quite often incorporated their own beliefs and free spirit regarding the religion]

    So, over the 1,000 year fight of Muslim Turk and Christian Europe, the symbols have come to be mistakingly representative of Islam by Europeans and now the world. The Crescent Moon and Star are ancient Turkish celestial symbols of power originating from the Turkish, ancestoral lands of Siberia and Central Asia. You see for a 1000 years Turks were the warriors, the leaders of Islam so it is not unusual that our symbols have been adopted by many present-day countries that are by a majority Muslim. But it doesn't mean that the symbols are Islamic or Muslim. Unfortunately, this confusion will most likely never be cleared up. It is very deep in the minds of the world, even the Muslim world.

    Interesting note: The representative color of all Turks in the world is Skyblue or Turquiose, but we have also ascribed color to the four cardinal directions (North=Black, East=SkyBlue, South=White, & West=Red). Therefore, the Red background is used to indicate that we are the most geographically western of our family. (Over time and among the folk, the color has also come to represent the Turkish blood shed over the centuries of warfare.)
  7. Zafran
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    Zafran Muslim Brother

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    salaam

    yeah the first question i asked on TTI was about the crescent, it gives out the wrong impression to non muslims.
  8. Albint_Almuslima
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    Albint_Almuslima Im Proud 2 B Me!

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    Asalam Alakum,

    Jazak Alah kheer..

    salam,
  9. TheHumbleWun
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    Salaam,

    I'm sure every Muslims know that the crescent moon and star has no blessing of any kind nor protection. It was more more so used as a symbol to replace the cross during times of war/conquer.

    Muslims don't promote the crescent moon & star as heavily as Christians who wear the cross around their necks while drinking, smoking, using profanity, going into the restroom with, thinking it will protect them, etc. It's bananas. :SMILY27:

    This is a little off tangent, do idols get destroyed and/or sent to hell on the Day of Judgment? What happens if someone worshiped the sun or the moon. Does the sun & the moon get sent to hell???
  10. hellbraker
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    hellbraker Junior Member

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    You know what?I was thinking of asking this same question today,but I thought someone will come up and ask.So Thank you for ur information.It helped me.
  11. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    Surah Maryam:

    19:81 And they have taken (for worship) aliha (gods) besides Allah, that they might give them honour, power and glory (and also protect them from Allahs Punishment etc.).

    19:82 Nay, but they (the so-called gods) will deny their worship of them, and become opponents to them (on the Day of Resurrection).
  12. Salem9022
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    Salem9022 Junior Member

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    This is very interesting video about the Origins of this symbol Especially how the Byzantium city called Constantinople used it before the turks.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVErHPZMsJ8

    [yt]dVErHPZMsJ8[/yt]

    The Greek city of Byzantium first produced coins with the crescent and star symbol in the 4th century BC and also used the emblem on their flag as an official governing symbol. According to legend, this was to honour the moon-goddess Hecate, who the inhabitants believed had saved the city from attack by Philip II of Macedon in 340-339 BC[5][6]. The crescent and star were used as the symbol of the Greek city of Byzantium for 8 centuries before adopted by the Byzantines as the banner of Constantinople. According to legend in 339 BC the city of Byzantium, (later known as Constantinople and then Istanbul), won a decisive battle under a brilliant waxing moon which they attributed to their patron Goddess Artemis (Diana in Roman mythology) whose symbol was the crescent moon.[7] In honor of Artemis the citizens adopted the crescent moon as their symbol (though some legends attribute the adoption to a Roman victory against the Goths on the first day of the lunar month). When the city became the Christian Roman Constantinople in 330 AD, Constantine also added the Virgin Mary's star on the flag.[citation needed] As such, it has been claimed that when the Ottoman Turks conquered Constantinople in 1453, they adopted the city's existing flag and symbol.[8][11]

    [​IMG]
    Symbol of Christian Constantinople Before the Turks conquered it.
  13. Rashadi
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    The best flag for a Muslim is one with the shahadah on it or the name of Allah Subhana wa Ta'ala. The crescent was never an Islamic symbol and there are no symbols in Islam. It is also believed that the crescent was a pre Islamic Turkish symbol.

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